El Mercadito Taqueria

IMG_8550

A three-taco plate at El Mercadito Taqueria.

The Taco Trail began as a way of finding taquerias via DART, but I haven’t sought out tortilla-based eats via public transit for month, as I have been busy with the Texas Monthly taco issue project for more than a year. All of my research has been done via automobile. So it was a pleasant surprise that I came across El Mercadito Taqueria while riding the Green Line recently.

Adjacent to the Burbank Station in an industrial district on the west side of Love Field and next door to Tortilleria El Molino, El Mercadito serves mostly workers looking for quick and cheap meals. Tacos are $2 and are served a few minutes after ordering. There are seven filling options to listed on the menu, among them carnitas, lengua and non-trompo pastor. The day I went, though there was only beef barbacoa, chicharron en salsa verde and fajita were available. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Dallas, DFW, Reviews

Los Torres Taqueria Is Closed

Processed with VSCOcam with c1 preset

The astonishing taco ahogado de birria estilo Sinaloa.

The home to the best taco in Dallas is gone. It closed last week. Speaking over the phone, co-owner Ramiro Torres said despite their best efforts, the family could not come to a new lease agreement with the landlord. Moreover, Torres told me, his sister Eva, could no longer manage the restaurant. She was burned out. Luis Perez, owner of La Norteña Tortilleria, the provider of Los Torres’ default Northern Mexican-style tortillas, said the family placed their final order last Saturday. This confirmation comes after I rode the bus past the restaurant Thursday night, noticing it was dark. The news does more than sadden me. It makes me physically ill.

Los Torres was the best taqueria in Dallas and served the best taco in Dallas, but to me it went beyond superlatives, beyond naming the taco ahogado as one of Texas Monthly’s top 10 tacos in the Lone Star State in their December issue. The little taqueria opened in 2012 at the rundown intersection of Clarendon and Edgefield. It’s neighbors were an elementary school, an auto shop and a laundromat. It was also 10 blocks from my house, and I was the first writer to review it. It was a helluva find. It reaffirmed traditional tacos while challenging American notions of Mexican food and tacos. The Sinaloan-style tacos heavy on the earthy-spiced goat meat served in gauzy handmade flour tortillas changed everything. Eating there forced me to reevaluate my list of Dallas’ great tacos, and I couldn’t help returning again and again, usually with my son. Los Torres became the father-and-son hang. Eva and the other woman overseeing the day-to-day operations doted on my then four-year-old boy. It’s at Los Torres that he earned the nickname Taquito. He had the run of the place, and would play among the tables and ride his bike inside between bites of carne asada and barbacoa tacos. Continue reading

4 Comments

Filed under Best of, Dallas, News, Oak Cliff, Texas

Join Me at Urban Taco’s Agave Trail Dinner Co-hosted by Texas Monthly, With Special Guest Revolver Taco Lounge

Los tacos. A La Tuma y Bistek Campechano

Campechano and a la Tuma tacos with elote/Courtesy Urban Taco

By now you’ve read Texas Monthly’s December issue, “The 120 Tacos to Eat Before You Die,” and you’ve begun sketching an itinerary to scarf them all. Thursday, December 10, you’ll be able to check off your list Urban Taco’s taco al pastor a la Tuma, one of top 10 tacos in Texas. You’ll do so at the multicourse Agave Trail Dinner at the taqueria’s flagship location on Dallas’ McKinney Avenue. The dinner is something Urban Taco, Lala’s Cakes and myself—a contributor to the issue—along with Texas Monthly have put together to celebrate tacos, Texan and Mexican, and the wonder that are agave spirits.

Each course will be paired with an agave spirit (e.g., mezcal, tequila, raicilla) in the form of a flight, cocktail and/or in the food, including the appetizer of mezcal-cured ceviche over a chicharrón tostada, a dish created for the dinner. The details follow. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

The Taco Trail to Texas Monthly

11794178_10152930642236697_2997267770106813930_o

The taco de colita de pavo at Flores Meat Market in El Paso.

¡Saludos! Welcome. You likely arrived here via Texas Monthly’s The 120 Tacos You Must Eat Before You Die issue. Thanks. I began working on that editorial package more than a year ago, when Pat Sharpe, the magazine’s food critic, and I initiated a conversation about what form a taco issue would take. Eventually we designed an evaluation sheet (printed in the magazine for your use); set about organizing a team (small but mighty); a schedule (grueling); and what I would contribute (a joyful lot). It was a dream come true for me.

I kicked off my exploration of Texas’ taco landscape in 2010, shortly after moving to the state. Initially I focused on exploring Dallas via public transit. Then I widen my scope to suburbs like Richardson and Addison. Fort Worth was next. Along the way, I ate tacos across Austin, where I have family and friends. Eventually I set my sights on San Antonio and the Rio Grande Valley.

Texas and its tacos are beautiful, I thought.  Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

Dia de los Puercos

Photo: Four Corners Brewing

For a couple of years now, I’ve partnered with Four Corners Brewing Co., maker of my go-to IPA, El Chingón, for taco events. I can’t seem to stop. Sharing tacos comes with my job description. The last one was Taco Night, a trompo taco-and-beer fiesta featuring Dallas’ best practitioners of tacos al pastor and tacos de trompo. Next up I’m helping out with Four Corners’ third-annual Dia de los Puercos on Sunday, November 1.

Inspired by the tradition of Día de los Muertos, it’s a day where we invite people to come celebrate “el día de hoy”…the “here and now”…with friends and family. For us, that simply includes fun people, great music, pork-centric eats and some tasty brews. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

First Bite: Resident Taqueria

A taco tray at Resident Taqueria.

A taco tray at Resident Taqueria.

Taco shops open and close every day, and few notice. It seems that everyone noticed Resident Taqueria opened. The restaurant, owned by husband and wife Andrew and Amy Savoie and designed by the Guest Group, has been one of my most anticipated taqueria openings of 2015. Andrew is a chef who honed his craft in renowned kitchens like Jean-Georges before taking root in Dallas’ Lake Highlands neighborhood, where Amy grew up. Both went all in on this concept of a taco spot geared toward the locals, a family restaurant, but with thoughtful fare that shows deference to the taco’s history and Mexican ingredients. Everything from the agua fresca to the signage and tortillas would be handmade. What a taqueria should be. So it’s been, and it’s been nuts.

That goes for the peppy peanuts claiming real estate on Resident’s tacos and for the buzz. Continue reading

3 Comments

Filed under DFW, first bite, Lake Highlands, Reviews, Texas

The Santa Fe Taco Trail

Photography: José R. Ralat

Eloisa’s pastrami tacos

There are state-sanctioned roadmaps for New Mexico’s green chile burgers and breakfast burritos. They are points of pride, and going Christmas-style on the breakfast burrito at Tia Sophia’s Restaurant, considered the home of the tortilla-wrapped morning behemoth, is proof enough. No such document exists for The Land of Enchantment’s tacos. But they are just as worthy of recognition as any of New Mexico’s signature foods. That’s what I realized during a trip to Santa Fe last week for the Santa Fe Wine & Chile Fiesta. Indeed, nearly all the Santa Feans I spoke with while visiting the city raved about their city’s tacos. I took their advice and hit the trail for Santa Fe tacos, beginning with the most recommended of the bunch. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under New Mexico, Santa Fe

Twister Tacos

Twister Tacos in Odessa is housed in a former fast-food joint building.

Twister Tacos in Odessa is housed in a former fast-food joint building.

Taquerias can find homes anywhere the local health department will allow them to set up shop. In the case of Twister Tacos in Odessa, Texas, it’s an old Mexican fast-food spot with a new paint job. The ruined concrete on the front patio remains where it fell, perhaps during a previous incarnation. I imagine it as a result of an AT-AT with a driver in need of his eyes examined.

The eyes are deceiving at Twister Tacos. The 11-year-old taqueria, whose current owner took over for her sister in January, advertises tacos al pastor straight from the trompo, but no trompo is visible on the premises. When I asked about the contraption, the owner’s daughter, who was running the cash register, stalled answering and when she did answer, her speech trailed off into mumbling.

The look of the pork filling deepened my doubt of the al pastor’s provenance. It looked more like pork chop resting in house-made chewy, flavor-neutral corn tortillas.

There is a winner here, though. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

John Tesar’s Plans for El Bolero Mexican Restaurant

El Bolero's tacos al pastor.

El Bolero’s tacos al pastor.

John Tesar is a no slouch. He is owner and executive chef at Knife. He has a cookbook in the works with Jordan Mackay, co-author with Aaron Franklin of Franklin Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto. He is developing an Italian restaurant concept. And he is partner-operator at Apheleia Restaurant Group’s Oak. There he has tweaked and streamlined the kitchen and menu and business is improving. Now comes news that he is doing the same at El Bolero, Apheleia’s upscale Mexican spot, after ownership and El Bolero’s opening executive chef parted ways last month.

My only dining experience at El Bolero was the restaurant’s first night of service, when the menu was limited and the service extremely attentive. I had ample time to speak with co-owner John Paul Valverde (whose Coeval Studio also designed the gorgeous space) that night. We talked about the need for a variety of salsa options. I lobbied for a plethora of choices like those available in Mexico City: whole beans, French fries, salsas of every color and Scoville heat unit. I spoke with a manager about agave spirits, and he customized a mezcal flight for me. All of this from the best seat in the house—at the bar in front of the trompo, where I got to watch the taquero work his knife against the spinning top of marinated pork. The tacos al pastor on fresh corn tortillas were good but the execution needed flare. Part of eating these Mexico City favorites is the show taqueros put on for customers, flicking knives this way and that, attempting to catch pineapple slices behind their backs.

I don’t know if the spectacle has been upped since El Bolero opened, but I do know that the trompo isn’t going anywhere. As Valverde told me via Facebook, “[The] trompo is always going to be there.” While that is a relief, like many with deep love and respect for tacos and Mexican regional cuisines, I was leery of how an Anglo chef—no matter how talented and respectful—would treat the food. Anglo-driven “Modern Mexican” has show more disregard than understanding when it comes to the tradition and history of Mexican food.

During a phone conversation, Tesar went a long way to assure me of his seriousness.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Dallas, Design District, DFW, News, Texas

Award-Winning Food Writer Lesley Téllez Coming to Dallas for the Dallas Tacography Panel and All-You-Can-Eat Tacos

More taco talk, this time with mezcal.

More taco talk, this time with mezcal.

Because I can’t stop when it comes to tacos, later this month I’m involved in a panel that will discuss the history and future of tacos in Dallas. The panel will be moderated by Lesley Téllez, award-wining food writer, former Dallasite, and author of Eat Mexico: Recipes From Mexico City’s Streets, Markets and Fondas. Tickets are on sale now and include all-you-can-eat tacos. More information is below.

From the cash-only hole-in-the-wall joint to the fancy taqueria, Dallas is obsessed with tacos. But how did they get here? How have they gone from crunchy shell to gourmet fillings? And why? What’s next for the street snack? The panel discussion Dallas Tacography: The Tortilla’s Tale in Big D at El Come Taco on Tuesday, July 14, will tackle those questions and more. With all-you-can-eat tacos.

Moderating Dallas Tacography will be Lesley Téllez, award-winning food writer and former Dallasite, and author of the new cookbook Eat Mexico: Recipes From Mexico City’s Streets, Markets and Fondas, released in June by Kyle Books. The book is a culinary love letter to one of the biggest cities in the world, with more than 100 recipes and beautiful on-location photography.

Joining Lesley in talking Dallas tacos will be a lineup of top-notch area food writers, restaurateurs and bloggers: Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized